Diet boosts the effectiveness of a cancer drug

Recent research reveals a drug that is capable of reducing and slowing down the growth of cancer is also capable of increasing the levels of the hormone insulin. This sudden spike in insulin reduces the effectiveness of this drug, however, researchers have discovered a diet that can reduce the insulin spikes and increase the benefits of the drug and its cancer therapy. These results were discovered in a study conducted on mice.

Majority of the research that examines various causes of resistance towards certain cancer drugs and treatments tends to focus on the tumour as opposed to other supportive factors. Certain resistance mechanisms can bring about changes inside the host body rather than reducing or slowing down the cancer. Experts believe that there is a large gap in the insight provided by medical research, particularly as far as the influence of certain dietary factors in the success of various cancer drugs and treatments is concerned. Researchers have largely neglected this factor, assuming that dietary factors have little part to play in the outcomes of a cancer treatment.

Recently conducted research reveals that certain cancer drugs that inhibit the formation of PI3K, a signalling protein, tend to be much more successful in fighting off cancer amongst a sample of mice, provided that the mice are being given a certain diet. The researchers have provided substantial evidence for the mechanisms that aid in bringing about these results.

All cancer patients seek to understand how altering their diet and eating habits can influence their prognosis, and experts and nutritionists provide a wide range of food and nutrient recommendations, which can be accessed online, and even while consulting your doctor. Often, advice about dietary recommendations for cancer patients tend to create unnecessary conflict.

PI3K Inhibitor

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For instance, a cancer patient might come across information that states that drastic reductions in dietary calorie consumption can supposedly aid in starving off a tumour in ways that are clinically beneficial. At the same time, patients might also be advised to maximize their dietary calorie consumption in order to prevent the drastic weight loss induced by cancer during the later stages of its progression. It is important to note that there is very little factual evidence and clinical research to support either of these ‘advices’.

Lack of sufficient high quality statistics and research on beneficial dietary recommendations for patients who are being treated for cancer is a widely common problem faced by doctors and physicians. Hopkins and his team of researchers have discovered compelling evidence regarding beneficial dietary recommendations from their recently conducted study based on mouse experiments.

The mouse experiments have revealed a diet that aids in maintaining low levels of the hormone insulin, which enhances and aids certain cancer treatments and drugs that hinder the formation of PI3K in being more effective. Researchers are profoundly interested in diet patterns and cancer drugs that can hinder PI3K signalling amongst cancer cells, and this is primarily because certain mutations that tend to trigger extreme activation of this pathway are widely associated with various types of cancers.

Countless pharmaceutical have made enormous research investments in producing drugs and medications that are capable of restraining the PI3K signally, however, majority of the clinical trials conducted to test the effectiveness of such medications only succeeded in provide a disappointingly mediocre amount of benefits.

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